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Yobs API Documentation

1. Introduction

Yobs is an AI and RESTful API-driven talent assessment service. The Yobs API uses resource-oriented URLs, supports HTTPS authentication and HTTPS verbs, and leverages JSON in all responses passed back to customers.

 

Yobs is used by customers in a wide variety of sectors, and supports a range of talent assessment insights. For a full list of our features, please see the Yobs AI Talent Assessment Report section below. Contrary to many cognitive services, we leverage a unique, human-in-the-loop approach to ensure quality and speed of service. For every media file passed to the API, we generate a confidence score based on the quality of the media file. If the confidence score is not high enough, the media file is sent to our team of trained reviewers who generate the report manually using our internal reviewer tools. We use a mix of human review, statistical checks and machine learning checks to ensure quality and speed.

 

This Programming Guide is designed to help customers get up-and-running with Yobs’ AI talent assessment services, both by providing the necessary context to understand the talent assessment industry and its regulations, and by giving technical guidance on how to work with the Yobs API.

Before gaining a Yobs sandbox or production account, you must first schedule a call with a Yobs Customer Success representative to create and credential your account. Click 'Request API Key' to get in touch with a representative.

Understanding the AI talent assessment process.

 

Yobs follows a standardized assessment process:

 

  1. Customer requests a talent assessment report for a person (candidate or employee.)

  2. The person is presented with open-ended, behavioral questions and submits the requested answers via Video or Audio recording. 

    • With a Yobs-hosted invitation flow, the person submits their own video or audio responses. 

    • With a customer-hosted flow, the customer collects the required video or audio responses, and passes the person's video or audio file URL using the Yobs API.

  3. Yobs' pre-processing layer generates a confidence score based on the quality of the media file. If the confidence score is high enough, Yobs runs its talent assessment engine on the digital interview. If the confidence score is too low, the media file is sent to our human reviewer system to generate the report based on the feature package requested.

  4. Yobs returns a finalized JSON report to the customer.

  5. The customer can take further action on the person based on an individualized assessment of their report.

Designing your workflow

 

Yobs’ API is flexible enough to support a range of workflows for integrating an AI talent assessment into your platform. At a high-level there are two options, each with unique pros and cons:

Pros

Cons

Customer-hosted

 experience

  • Seamless, customizable user experience

  • Potential for higher completion rates

  • Ability to measure conversion at each stage

  • Requires greater engineering resources

  • Customers must host and store the digital files in their servers.

Yobs-hosted

experience

  • Yobs hosts and maintains digital recording experience

  • Easy to implement and get up and running 

  • Less control over user experience

  • Less flexibility around API-specific automated workflows

2. Yobs AI Talent Assessment Report

API clients can currently choose from the following list of features to have included in their Talent Assessment reports. Yobs outputs are grouped into the four types of insights they represent: Demographic Insights, Emotional State Insights, Thinking Style Insights, Big 5 Traits Insights. Yobs scores are all outputted as percentiles.

 

Definitions of the outputs are available in the table below.

 

I. Demographic Insights :

 

  • Gender prediction 

  • Ethnicity prediction

  • Age prediction 

 

II. Emotional State Insights :

 

  • Engagement: Measures how engaged a person is. 

  • Positivity:  Measures how positive a person’s demeanor is. 

  • Attention: Measures the attention of a person. 

  • Pitch: Measures the variance in a person’s pitch. 

  • Joy: Measures the joy of a person. 

  • Energetic: Measures how much energy a person is conveying. 

  • Emotional_tone: Scores range from Negative (1) to Positive (99). A score around 50 is considered Neutral and suggests either a lack of emotionality or similar amounts of positive and negative emotions.

  • Cold: Measures the degree to which a person is emotionally unresponsive. 

  • Confident: Measures how confident a person is. 

  • Authentic: Measures how truthful and genuine a person is. 

  • Aggressive: Measures the degree to which a person expresses anger or agression. 

III. Thinking style : 

 

  • Imaginative: Measures the degree to which someone is imaginative.  

  • Persuasive: Measures the degree to which a person is able to create rapport with the intention of persuading others. 

  • Self_assured: Measures how much confidence a person has in themselves. 

  • Trusting: Measures how easily a person trusts others. 

  • Organized: Measures how organized and orderly a person is.

  • Disciplined: Measures the propensity for someone to follow rules. 

  • Analytic: A high number reflects formal, logical, and hierarchical thinking; lower numbers reflect more informal, personal, here-and-now, and narrative thinking.

  • Ambitious: Measures the degree to which a person is driven by a desire of achievement. 

  • Independent: Measures the degree to which a person is non-conformist. 

  • Assertive: Measures how comfortable a person is with sharing their emotional state. 

  • Insecure: Measures the degree to which a person lacks confidence when dealing with others. 

  • Intellectual: Measures to what degree a person is inclined toward intellectual and academic learning. 

  • Thinking_style: Measures the degree to which someone is an analytics thinker who relies on facts and data versus instinct or feelings when making decisions.  

  • Dutiful: Measures a person’s sense that they should respect expectations and responsibility. 

  • Empathetic: Measures how strongly a person internalizes the feelings of others. 

  • Emotionally_aware: Measures to what degree a person is connected with their feelings and emotions. 

  • Power_driven: Measures the degree to which a person thinks about money and finances. 

  • Work_oriented: Measures the degree to which a person is preoccupied with work or school. 

  • Money_oriented: Measures the degree to which a person thinks about money and finances. 

          

IV. “Big 5” Character traits :

 

• Conscientiousness (Efficient\Organized vs. Easy Going\Careless): 

A tendency to be organized and dependable, show self-discipline, act dutifully, aim for achievement, and prefer planned rather than spontaneous behavior.

 

• Agreeableness ((Friendly\Compassionate vs. Challenging\Detached): 

A tendency to be compassionate and cooperative rather than suspicious and antagonistic towards others. It is also a measure of one's trusting and helpful nature, and whether a person is generally well-tempered or not.

 

• Openness to learning (Inventive\Curious vs. Consistent\Cautious): 

Openness reflects the degree of intellectual curiosity, creativity and a preference for novelty and variety a person has. It is also described as the extent to which a person is imaginative or independent, and depicts a personal preference for a variety of activities over a strict routine.

 

• Extraversion (Outgoing\Energetic vs. Solitary\Reserved):

 Energy, positive emotions, surgency, assertiveness, sociability and the tendency to seek stimulation in the company of others, and talkativeness.

 

• Neuroticism (Sensitive\Nervous vs. Secure\Confident): 

The tendency to experience unpleasant emotions easily, such as anger, anxiety, depression, and vulnerability. Neuroticism also refers to the degree of emotional stability and impulse control and is sometimes referred to by its low pole, "emotional stability”.

3. Guide to succesfully using the API 

A. Tips to ensure accurate reporting

Here are tips on video recording to ensure the Yobs API returns an accurate report:

 

1. Each video URL length should be 90 seconds in aggregate minimum. For example, if a person recorded 3 video answers of 30 seconds each, you should combine the 3 videos in one video of 90 seconds in aggregate before passing it through the API. Shorter videos may lack enough data to offer compelling insights.  

 

2. The following video codecs are supported: .MOV, .WMV, .FLV, .AVI, .MP4, .WEBM

 

3. Video should involve only one (1) person; the face should be clearly visible in the video. No full body. Face and shoulder view is best.

 

4. Audio should be of acceptable quality. Background disturbance like music or loud background noise may affect the quality of the analysis.

 

5. Video should be of acceptable quality. We recommend at least 360 kbps, but there is no need for HD or ultra HD quality. Low quality image may affect the quality of the analysis.

 

6. The person must be speaking in the video. If the person was silent for the duration of the video, the API will return an error. 

B. Tips to interpret the "Big 5" in talent assessment reports

Download our full scoring guide for people operations teams here.

Openness to experience

High Score

▪ Personal Strength: Excellent problem solving skills, curiosity, and the ability to work well independently. High creative thinking.

▪ Personal Weakness: Tends to be unpredictable and have a natural preference for seeking risk and not following rules. This may perturb the image supervisors and/or your subordinates have of employee.

 

Average Score

▪ Personal Strength: Fairly adaptive, with good problem solving skills, and a creative outlook towards unfamiliar situations.

▪ Personal Weakness: Sometimes not keen to follow strict guidelines, which is important in jobs where the method must be followed in detail.

 

Low Score

▪ Personal Strength: A dedicated and practical individual, with a high focus on order and rules. A straight shooter in communication.

▪ Personal Weakness: Often inflexible and tends to be adamant about their ideas. This trait can make teamwork more difficult if left unchecked, and may miss out on creative ideas in brainstorming.

Conscientiousness

 

High Score

▪ Personal Strength: They aim for excellence and are very well organized. Top class attention to detail and accountability.

▪ Personal Weakness: May need to be more flexible and less perfectionist.

 

Average Score

▪ Personal Strength: Gets the work done and usually keeps the details in mind when given a task.

▪ Personal Weakness: May sometimes oversee out-of-the-box thinking or some important details when trying to problem-solve or communicate with clients and teammates.

 

Low Score

▪ Personal Strength: Open to experimenting with new methods and environments and are not expected to slow down because of a failure. They’d rather focus on the big picture than on logistical details of the strategy.

▪ Personal Weakness: Tends to focus less on details and have a more casual approach towards work than most. Left unchecked, this can lead to failure to hit business targets and catch crucial details.

Extraversion

 

High Score

 

▪ Personal Strength: They bring a lot of positive energy in the team and maintain an interactive environment. They show natural leadership!

▪ Personal Weakness: Their assertive nature can be seen as a sign of aggression by others. They may overwhelm or impose their ways on some team members who have lower energy levels.

 

Average Score

▪ Personal Strength: They are ambivert, neither too openly enthusiastic or too reserved. They can connect with many types of folks thanks to adaptive energy levels. Ambiverts make great salesmen/women!

▪ Personal Weakness: They need both alone-time to recharge and team interactions to challenge them. Do not overlook one or the other one for optimal personal growth!

 

Low Score

 

▪ Personal Strength: Independent thinking. They have a truly reflective personality. Their self-awareness is one of their biggest strengths!

▪ Personal Weakness: Being naturally more quiet and less interested in social events around them, some may interpret their behavior as an unfriendly or bored.

Agreeableness

High Score

 

▪ Personal Strength: Trustworthy, have great empathy and get along with people very well. A natural at collaborative work, they are a true people’s person!

▪ Personal Weakness: Their empathy can be seen as a sign of weakness in the workplace. Especially competitive or zero-sum environments.

 

Average Score

▪ Personal Strength: They are balanced and respect the opinion of other people and usually choose what is best for the team while keeping their interests in mind.

▪ Personal Weakness: That balance might sometimes weigh more towards focusing on their own interests too much or towards spending too much helping others. Stay mindful of this balance.

 

Low Score

▪ Personal Strength: Capable of making crucial and sometimes unpopular decisions. Solid as a rock when the time calls for it!

▪ Personal Weakness: Their uncompromising nature might be seen as a sign of dominance and unfriendly nature in a team. Be mindful of their collaboration skills and management style to get the best out of your team.

Neuroticism

 

High Score

▪ Personal Strength: Very involved about the tasks they are given and they have a dynamic personality.

▪ Personal Weakness: Often do not perform well under pressure. The quality of their deliverables and their best behavior may be negatively affected in stressful situations.

 

Average Score

▪ Personal Strength: Fairly attentive to details or threats, but may still feel anxiety and lower confidence in stressful situations.

▪ Personal Weakness: Often more anxious than their peers, which may impede performance.

 

Low Score

▪ Personal Strength: Very emotionally stable and reliable under pressure. Stressful situations don’t affect them as much as they do most people!

▪ Personal Weakness: Because they’re more resistant to stress than most, they may sometimes be less emotionally reactive to problems and make small mistakes or perform below their full potential.

5. How does the service work and how accurate is it? 

To learn more about the science behind the service, and how the service infers talent traits from voice, speech and video data, please visit our science page

Yobs conducted a validation study with an independent group of I/O psychology researchers to understand the accuracy of the approach to inferring a personality profile for the automated portion of the service. Yobs worked with a team of leading Psychometrics researchers to measure the accuracy of the service on a sample of between 600 and 1200 participants for all characteristics. To establish ground truth, participants took two sets of standard psychometric tests:

  • A 20-item Big Five derived from the International Personality Item Pool (IPIP)

  • To account for the bias in self-rated assessments of personality, Yobs had several researchers blindly rate each participant's video interview on all characteristics. Inter-rater reliability was measured in order to ensure the reliability of the researchers' ratings. 

Yobs then compared the scores that were derived by its models with the survey-based scores and expert observer scores for the video interview users. Based on these results, Yobs determined the average Mean Absolute Error and average correlation between the inferred and actual scores for the different categories of personality characteristics. 

Based on the results of this validation study, the personality scores predicted by Yobs were shown to be strongly, positively correlated with all 'actual' personality scores. Yobs was also shown to outperform other popular cognitive services that were benchmarked in the study.

 

You can speak with one of our client representatives to learn more about the service and the study results.